Project Team

 
Warren-5.jpg

Dr. Warren Allmon, director

Dr. Allmon is the Director of the Paleontological Research Institution and the Hunter R. Rawlings III Professor of Paleontology in the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at Cornell University. He is a Fellow of both the Geological Society of America and the Paleontological Society, and recipient of the 2004 Award for Outstanding Contribution to Public Understanding of Geoscience from the American Geological Institute.

Dr. Robert Ross, associate director for outreach

Dr. Ross manages all educational programming at the Paleontological Research Institution and its two public venues for education – the Museum of the Earth and the Cayuga Nature Center. Ross has facilitated the expansion of programming for local school and community groups, helped found teacher professional development programs focused on place-based learning and authentic science experiences, and has participated in various national initiatives to improve Earth science education throughout the U.S.

BETH STRICKER, director of exhibitions

Ms. Stricker is an exhibit developer and designer with a decade of experience – from private firm to independent contractor to non-profit organization. Her background is in exhibition development for historic sites and natural history museums, with a focus on multisensory learning experiences for families. Since 2010, she has overseen all exhibits projects at the Paleontological Research Institution where she manages exhibit development, design, fabrication, and installation.


Brinkman.jpg

Dr. Paul Brinkman

Dr. Brinkman is a museum professional with overlapping interests in the sciences and the humanities. His research interest is in history of nineteenth century natural sciences, especially paleontology and geology. He is the head of the History of Science Research lab at the N. C. Museum of Natural Sciences and Adjunct Associate Professor in the History Department at N. C. State University.

Davidson2.jpg

Dr. Jane Davidson

Dr. Davidson received her MA in History from Louisiana State University and her PhD in the History of Flemish and Dutch Baroque Painting from the University of Kansas. She is a professor at the University of Nevada, Reno, and publishes in the areas of history and iconography of witchcraft, 17th century painting, and history of paleontology. 

Dr. Sandra Carlson

Dr. Carlson received her MS and PhD degrees in Geological Sciences from the University of Michigan. She has worked as a research scientist and professor in the Department of Geology (now Earth and Planetary Sciences) at the University of California, Davis for three decades. Carlson is currently the Past-President of The Paleontological Society, and the Faculty Director of the UC Davis CalTeach/MAST program.

Julie Fick

Currently the Science Educator at the Michigan State University Museum, Ms. Fick previously worked as outreach coordinator and then director of the Capital Area Science and Math Center in St. Johns, Mich., as well as serving as assistant director of education for the Roger Tory Peterson Institute of Natural History in Jamestown, New York.

Kissel.jpg

Dr. Richard Kissel

Dr. Kissel is Director of Public Programs at the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, where he leads public education and the development, design, and production of exhibitions. He is a vertebrate paleontologist, science educator, and author with more than 20 years of experience within the museum field. 

levin.jpg

Dr. Miriam Levin

Dr. Levin is currently the Henry Eldridge Bourne Professor of History at Case Western Reserve University. Her research, publishing, teaching, and related activities are devoted to critically examining how technology and science were integrated into modern society. She is the author of Defining Women’s Scientific Enterprise: Mount Holyoke Faculty and the Rise of American Science, and has also curated several exhibitions on science and technology. 

montgomery2.jpg

Dr. Georgina Montgomery

Dr. Montgomery is an award winning educator and researcher whose teaching and scholarship focuses on issues of inclusion in science, the history of field science, and the history of primatology. She is an associate professor in Lyman Briggs College and the Department of History at Michigan State University and serves as director of Science and Society @ State, an initiative which seeks to promote new interdisciplinary collaborations on campus.